Colorado Golf Club is setting itself apart from every other

This list of awards and accolades for one of the newest courses in the state immediately sets this facility apart from nearly every other in Colorado:

#33 in Golfweek‘s Top 100 Modern Courses (2018)
#4 in Golfweek‘s Top 100 Residential Courses (2018)
#111 in Golf Digest‘s Top 200 Greatest Courses (2017-18)
2019 U.S. Mid-Amateur Championship Host Site
2013 Solheim Cup Host Site
2010 Senior PGA Championship Host Site
Clubhouse of the Year – Golf Inc. Magazine (2013)
Best New Private Course – GOLF Magazine & Sports Illustrated (2007)

Colorado Golf Club‘s prestigious layout is routed through the rolling plains, ponderosa pines and rugged barrancas affording players amazing views of the Rocky Mountains. The duo of Coore/Crenshaw did a brilliant job designing this incredibly difficult test of golf, further bolstering their reputation as some of the best modern course designers in the game.

As far as service goes, Colorado Golf Club exceeds all expectations — every single club employee we encountered was helpful, friendly and invested in ensuring all of our needs were met during our visit. We were visitors to the facility and we were all treated as though we had been founding members of the club!  The impression the staff made on all of us was a lasting and positive testament to how well the club is managed.

Colorado Golf Club stands as truly and elite Colorado golf facility. Colorado Golf Club is slowly climbing the list of enviable private club invites for those in the know.

Colorado Golf Club

Parker, CO

Designers:  Bill Coore/Ben Crenshaw

Opened for play in 2007

Private Golf Course

www.coloradogolfclub.com

 

Arrowhead Golf Club is a sight for everyone to behold

Just south of the ever spreading Denver sprawl sits one of Colorado’s most iconic golf courses: Arrowhead Golf Club. The reason this course is where all of the golfing locals take their out-of-town guests is 300 million years in the making. You won’t find many courses anywhere in there world that is routed through looming red rock formations that stand in stark contrast to the green grass and the Colorado blue bird skies.

From the very first tee shot players will face extreme elevation changes, abundant wildlife, and thousands of feet of ancient red sandstone rocks towering majestically above the fairways. Arrowhead is one of the top-10 most photographed golf courses in the world, and has been voted the #1 public golf course in the Denver area, as well as one of America’s “Top 75 Public Courses” by Golf Digest.

Since its opening in 1972, the Robert Trent Jones Jr./Sr. design has been a course to brag about playing, and will continue that reputation for many years to come. Thankfully, Arrowhead remains fully accessible to the public, allowing anyone to share in the truly amazing golf experience. The unique design could easily have been hidden behind the veil of privacy reserved for only the wealthy, but that doesn’t mean the experience comes cheap. This one-of-a-kind golf experience is going to be on the high end of the daily fee scale but well worth the price of admission!

Arrowhead Golf Club

Littleton, CO

Designers:  Robert Trent Jones Sr./Robert Trent Jones Jr.

Opened for play in 1972

Daily Fee Golf Course

www.arrowheadcolorado.com

 

 

Cure Putters offer an antidote for flat stick woes

Cure putters

According to a study by Dr. Lucius Riccio, an original member of the USGA’s handicap research team, cited by golfpracticeguides.com, the average golfer makes 36 strokes or less with a putter per 18-hole round. That’s two putts per hole, and, according to our math skills, is pretty much half of the total number of strokes you’d make for a par 72 round. Kinda makes you realize just how awful three putts can be, and how important your flat stick really is.

Practice usually does make perfect, but when you’ve reached a point in your game where you’re comfortable with your putting stroke, it’s time to tinker with the tech.

Like drivers, big brand names typically dictate what most consider “the best” putters on the market, but if you’re really serious about saving strokes on the green, consider looking at smaller, specialized clubmakers. Cure Putters is a perfect example. The company launched with two models at the 2014 PGA Merchandise Show to immediate success. 5 years later Cure touts 12 models, each designed to perform for every golfer.

Cure TourX1

Cure’s Tour X1 blade putter

Cure’s claim to fame is its “extremely High MOI” (moment of inertia). As the company explains on the website, a common misconception regarding high MOI putters is that they only offer forgiveness on off-center hits. They certainly do, but Cure’s high MOI designs also keep the clubface more square throughout the entire stroke, which, combined with that off-center forgiveness, equals more distance and directional control. (These results are also based on a player’s individual “IDEAL WEIGHT” — which basically means you’ll want to be fitted to optimize the weight of your Cure putter.)

The company graciously sent 3 putters built to spec to the CGB headquarters for review purposes, and our first impressions from the practice green: Cure = Pure. (We won’t be sending these back.)

With my usual blade putter, a pre-Titleist Scotty Cameron, I sometimes struggle with the initial takeaway in my backswing, wavering off square from the ball within the first few inches of my stroke. When this happens, I find myself focusing solely on correcting my clubface mid swing — often over or under compensating — and neglecting the other factors determining if the ball goes in the hole or not, like distance control. But after several practice putts with the Cure Tour X1 ($299.95), I found myself having to force the clubhead to waver on my takeaway to produce similar mishits. The Tour X1’s aluminum clubhead, with tungsten weights in the toe and heel and removable steel weights in the back, helps promote a straight and silky smooth stroke overall — truly noticeable — and the feel and sound of the ball coming off the 4.85″ milled face is unreal. Putt after putt after putt with the Cure rolled as pure and on line as one could ask for, and even toed and heeled shots only went slightly off line, still delivering not-so-terrible results. The confidence this club brings to my backswing allows me to focus on my desired line and pace, knowing the ball will come square off the clubface. Finding the pace can be a bit tricky to get used to if your Cure is any heavier than the putter you’re use to playing — really, though, when is it not? — and you may find it all to easy to muscle it past the hole until you get it dialed in (all the more reason to get fitted.)

The Tour X1 is a beautiful club to look at, too. Though one of Cure’s smaller designs, the clubhead is still larger than most blades you’ll see, but with a solid black finish, hidden weights and clean lines, it isn’t distracting to the eye or gaudy in any way. Aside the X1, Cure’s Tour Series includes two mallet designs in the X2 and X3, both with seemingly impressive features along the same lines.

Cure CX1

Cure’s CX1 blade putter

The praise continues on to the CX1 ($279.95) from Cure’s Classic Series. With a slightly larger 5″ clubface, the CX1 touts the same weight systems, milled face and high MOI as the Tour X1, but the slightly bulkier design reads and feels a lot more like a mallet hybrid than a traditional blade putter — the best of both worlds. Speaking of mallets, the Classic Series includes two traditional mallet designs with the CX3 and CX4, and rounds out its blade design offerings with the CX2. The Classic Series putters are also available in red, black, or white, to add another touch of style.

While it’s clear Cure putters isn’t making your average blades and mallets, the company obviously wants to make sure it stands out from the pack. The RX Series does an excellent job of that — easily the most customizeable putters that have ever come through the CGB headquarters. The RX Series sports an eye-catching door handle design and “t bar” alignments; the putters vary by profile size with the RX3 ($259.95) being the smallest with a 5.25″ milled face. Other than that, there’s little you can’t customize on these putters. Each comes with two, 12g, 1/4″ aluminum and two, 35g, 1/4″ steel toe and heel disk weights added and removed with a standard hex tool (additional weight sets sold separately). Not only that, the RX Series boast interchangeable shafts and customizeable lie angles.

When we first heard of this feature, honestly, is sounded like a pain in the ass to have to worry about or adjust in on the fly, but that is far from reality. Two screws on the bottom of the putter loosen the shaft housing with a 1/4 turn, allowing you to move the shaft freely and adjust the angle as needed. All in all, the RX Series may sound more like a DeChambeau-like science experiment than something an average golfer would have in the bag, but the customization process takes about as long as it does to adjust the loft on your driver — and a lot more fun — so don’t let that be a deterrent. Sorry, lefties, the RX Series putters come RH only, in black or red.

Cure RX3

Cure’s RX3 putter

While we’ve only had the chance to play those noted above, we can assume the same performance rings true throughout the company’s offerings. Cure putters — all of which are USGA conforming — come equipped with straight or offset shafts in standard lengths (custom lengths available by request), a branded Winn Pistol midsize grip and durable leather clubhead cover. The company also offers accessories and gear, as well as a trade-in program. Really, if you’re interested in making more gains on the green, you’d be remiss to not try a Cure putter, at the very least. With an optimized stroke using your own ideal weight, you my find yourself inching closer to that 36 or below number at the end of your round.

ColoradoGolfBlog, in some cases, receives a small commission when you purchase items from these links. CGB has endorsed all advertisers, products and services and advertising does not influence editorial decisions or content.

TRUE Linkswear is making the best damn golf shoes. Period.

TRUE Linkswear Original

TRUE Original

TRUE Linkswear has a simple ask: Enjoy the walk. And they’ve made it extremely easy.

To say the 10 year-old company is making the best golf shoes money can buy may be bold enough, but I’ll take it one step further and say TRUE Links is also making the best lifestyle shoes money can buy.

I’m not lying, but first I’ll make our case for them on the course.

We were first introduced to the TRUE Originals ($149) and the TRUE Outsiders ($139) two years ago when they graciously sent a few pairs to the CGB headquarters. Both lines tout casual yet athletic designs — clean lines and simple, tasteful features, and just the right amount of edge — but the performance of the shoes is what’s most evident at first look.

Set atop the company’s signature cross life rubber tread is beautiful full grain waterproof leather, layered with a waterproofed Symptax bootie, and coated with a water repelling “system.” All this is to say that, according to the companies website, TRUEs are the highest performing waterproof shoes in the game. The company backs that claim up with a 2-year waterproof guarantee — depending on the model — but they may be selling themselves short.

(For those curious and or concerned about where TRUE’s waterproofing products are sourced, the company places a high priority on health and environmental safety. See this page for more details.)

TRUE_Outsider

TRUE Outsider

Colorado can’t compare to the sogginess of the Pacific Northwest, where TRUE Links was born, but we do have a fair share of elements to deal with on the course all year round. A little more than 2 years in, and after countless rounds in rain, sleet, snow, ice, mud and everything else, our TRUEs are still going strong. Aside from the nicks and creases that come with normal wear and tear my Outsiders perform like new, keeping my feet dry, and happy.

The comfort level is off the charts, mainly due to the wide base sole that lets your arches and toes spread out naturally as you step and swing — particularly important for those of us with wider feet — and the foot-conforming inserts have only gotten more comfortable over time. The sturdy tread proves reliable no matter how wet and slippery the conditions, and moves like tennis or hiking shoes. Strolls down the fairway aren’t interrupted by any rubbing, pinching or other discomforts either. You truly couldn’t ask for more from a golf shoe on the course.

To many, though, golf is more than a game; it’s a lifestyle. It only makes sense a golf shoe company would deliver a product built for the grind on and off the course.

TRUE_Knits

TRUE Knits

We live an active lifestyle off the course — hiking, skiing, camping, sports, etc. — so the TRUE Outsiders and Originals remain a go-to for worry free footwear. My pair is a must for trips to the creek at the local dog park (where the 2-year waterproof test for this review occurred). No matter how much mud and gunk I traipse through, a simple rinse with a damp rag and these shoes and ready to go again.

Other times, though, something a little more relaxed is in order. That’s a perfect time to bring out the TRUE Knits. The Knits’ ($129) design is more in the casual sportswear realm, meaning high points in performance can still be expected on and off the course, and they’re a perfect tennis shoe substitute. Clearly, the Knits are not waterproof, but the polyester material does keep your feet dry in dew-like conditions — and talk about ventilation.

The Knits are effortlessly cool. The design is sleek and sublet at first glimpse, but a closer look reveals a classic wingtip pattern formed into the beautiful material. On more than one occasion I’ve taken my Knits from a business meeting straight to the tee box, and never fail to earn some compliments along the way.

TRUE_OGP

TRUE OG Premium

The TRUE OG Premium ($179) is the company’s latest release. While we have yet to get our hands on them — or feet in them, if you will — the OGP may the best TRUE shoe yet. As noted in the product description, it’s basically the Original design wrapped in a ultra premium vintage brown leather. Given TRUE’s performance track record and the stunning design, the OGP went to the top of our 2019 wishlist immediately.

If you haven’t figured it out by now, know that we have nothing negative to say about TRUE Linkswear’s offerings (except wishing there were even more lines to shop from). With unmatched performance, unquestionable style, and the highest quality materials, TRUE Links is making the best golf and lifestyle shoes. And that’s no lie.

Enjoy the walk.

ColoradoGolfBlog, in some cases, receives a small commission when you purchase items from these links. CGB has endorsed all advertisers, products and services and advertising does not influence editorial decisions or content.

GolfBoard offers an experience unlike any other, with the added bonus of faster play

When CGB got an invite from The Country Club of Colorado to try GolfBoards, we could barely contain our excitement. We had all seen the promo videos, but we we also heard some horror stories, so we weren’t really sure what to expect. In the pro shop we learned there was a training video and liability waiver we’d have to sign prior to taking them out on the course, but that wasn’t about to stop us from the prospect of shredding down the manicured fairways of C.C.C. on these things. (We ended up skipping the video, by the way — safety first!)

The GolfBoard setup is brilliantly simple: a wide board platform — a little bigger than your average mountain board — mounted on two axels and four sturdy tires. A large handle bar is fixed to the front of the board with forward/reverse and speed controls (high or low), a very basic cupholder, and bag straps on the front for weight distribution, but the handlebar is not used for steering. The steering mechanism is controlled by moving the board platform itself, much like snowboarding’s toe and heel turns. The sturdy build gives you confidence in the machine’s durability, and the wheels and tires prove capable of handling most any course landscape like your standard golf cart.

Golfboard Cheyenne Mountain

When we first laid eyes on the GolfBoard in person, though, there was definite hesitation. I’m not sure why I thought differently, but the boards are a lot bigger than what I expected, and seeing the attendant trying to maneuver the thing out of the cart barn hinted that this wasn’t going to be a get-on-and-go kind of situation.

After some peer pressure and not wanting to disappoint our hosts, the first ride was a quick circle in front of the pro shop. But it wasn’t quick if you include all the stop and gos, awkward bailouts and near crashes.

These things are heavy. At 165 pounds, I’d venture to say I’m pretty close to the same weight of a GolfBoard itself, or less, and even as a veteran snowboarder I had a lot of trouble maneuvering it at low speeds, especially on pavement. Turning radius wasn’t on my mind at all until I was actually standing on the board, and it takes some getting used to the fact that they basically have none — seriously, You’ll make sharper turns in a club cart. I also struggled to keep myself from trying to rely on the handle to steer like a scooter.

Truth be told, the majority of our foursome grew skeptical of the boards after our short jaunt in front of the pro shop, so our videographer, Dave, was assigned to take the only one we had off the first tee. A couple holes in, though, it was clear our test rides were far from the actual GolfBoard experience. Watching Dave tear down the no.1 and 2 fairways quickly had us all itching for a turn.

Golfboard

These things haul down the fairways and rough on the high speed setting — and it’s incredible how much easier it is to maneuver them on turf. The smooth ride is ridiculously fun, and makes it hard to focus on your shot planning when all you can think about is getting back on the board and pulling the throttle back. The good times only slow down again moving between greens and tee boxes — basically anytime you’re on pavement or making turns of any kind.

Golfboard happy

It’s is easy to feel like you’re losing control of the board and not know how to react when things get dicey at-speed. From my personal experience I can tell you: Just bail off the board, safely, and let the automatic brake stop the it before something catastrophic happens to one or both of you.

By the time each of us had a turn on the board we were hooked. After a round of 18 C.C.C. was gracious enough to offer our group another 9, with 3 more GolfBoards, and we couldn’t say no.

With each of us equipped with a board one thing became abundantly clear: enjoying this kind of thrill while playing the game we love is one thing, but GolfBoards enable an incredible pace of play when playing ready golf. After our foursome’s first 18 with one board and two carts — coming in at just over 3.5ish hours — we made quick work of the pristine back 9 with the 4 boards, in just under an hour and a half (including plenty of time “testing” the product.)

GolfBoards are available in several makes and models for retail — with accessories available — but with a high price point you’re better off getting your kicks at a “showcase” course. GolfBoard makes it easy with a nationwide GolfBoard course finder.

In all, the GolfBoard delivers an exciting, one-of-a-kind experience to add to what we love about the sport of golf. It’s an icing on the cake product with the added benefit of faster pace of play and a roaring good time. It’s damn near impossible not to have fun when you’re cruising fairways on one of these, and fun is what this game is all about.

Jones Golf Bags set the standard in style, tradition and performance

The new age of golf has become a melting pot of tradition, performance, and modern style. Clothing and shoe companies have always been front and center when it comes to new trends, but there are other trailblazers in the equipment game, too.

Jones Golf Bags is one of those trendsetters, staying on the cutting edge of performance and design with a nod to the game’s traditional style. The company began out of the trunk of a cab, from which founder George Jones sold is hand-sewn bags. More than 40 years later, the company produces some of the most durable and stylish bags we’ve ever carried.

When shopping Jones’ lines it’s apparent the company holds traditional designs close to heart. This means sleek, compact bags with fewer but larger storage compartments, and built to be carried. Jones’ carry bags (ranging from $139.95 to $169.95) top out at under 4lbs, and the sturdy, plush shoulder straps make for an easy trek no matter the model.

The Jones Original is the most traditional of the designs. It’s simply beautiful — literally and figuratively — with a classic unstructured body, 3-way top divider, and a single shoulder strap. This is the bag that started it all, as the web description notes.

Jones graciously sent CGB a pair of customized Utility Bags, among the company’s stand bag offerings (ranging from $174.95 to $229.95). After the gitty-ness of the unboxing wore off, the quality of the bags stood out. The water resistant nylon has proven to withstand an ample amount of fall and winter golf in Colorado without wear and tear, and the sturdy, smooth zippers make access to storage quick and easy. The Utility also sports the new “draw string” pouch for even quicker access to on-course essentials.

Jones calls its patented stand system the “gold standard,” and that sounds like a safe bet. Not matter the lie, the legs hold the bag steady and fold back into place smoothly when picked up, rivaling only one other bag I’ve ever played. During my high school career — when my love/hate relationship with walking the course began — our hand-me-down Ping Hoofer 2s were among the most coveted equipment. The reliability of the stand system and the simple design brought solace to our agonizing practice rounds, and no one wanted to return them at the end of season. I later switched to Ogio, and while durable and convenient I always struggled to find a design that wasn’t too modern for my taste, or didn’t have a bunch of features I didn’t need.

At capacity, the Utility is a cinch to carry (about 5lbs when empty) — I usually pack a couple sleeves of balls, range finder, water, snacks, tees and markers, and extra layers, along with the standard number of clubs. The standard single strap is more than enough to keep this bag comfortable on my shoulder, though it does come with an additional strap if you prefer the backpack-style carry. It feels strange to note how comfortable a golf bag is, but in this case it’s hard not to.

What’s more, Jones offers personalization on all of their products — the company also has backpacks, luggage, coolers, and more of equal quality — making your gorgeous bag a one-of-a-kind piece and the envy of your group.

In all, we’re blown away with Jones’ offerings and believe we’ve found a new benchmark to which we’ll compare the rest. Golf has always been a game of style, class, and tradition, and it always will be. Companies like Jones Golf Bags exude that aesthetic, finding a perfect balance between the then and now, and setting the standard for the game’s next generation.

ColoradoGolfBlog, in some cases, receives a small commission when you purchase items from these links. CGB has endorsed all advertisers, products and services and advertising does not influence editorial decisions or content.