Colorado Golf Club is setting itself apart from every other

This list of awards and accolades for one of the newest courses in the state immediately sets this facility apart from nearly every other in Colorado:

#33 in Golfweek‘s Top 100 Modern Courses (2018)
#4 in Golfweek‘s Top 100 Residential Courses (2018)
#111 in Golf Digest‘s Top 200 Greatest Courses (2017-18)
2019 U.S. Mid-Amateur Championship Host Site
2013 Solheim Cup Host Site
2010 Senior PGA Championship Host Site
Clubhouse of the Year – Golf Inc. Magazine (2013)
Best New Private Course – GOLF Magazine & Sports Illustrated (2007)

Colorado Golf Club‘s prestigious layout is routed through the rolling plains, ponderosa pines and rugged barrancas affording players amazing views of the Rocky Mountains. The duo of Coore/Crenshaw did a brilliant job designing this incredibly difficult test of golf, further bolstering their reputation as some of the best modern course designers in the game.

As far as service goes, Colorado Golf Club exceeds all expectations — every single club employee we encountered was helpful, friendly and invested in ensuring all of our needs were met during our visit. We were visitors to the facility and we were all treated as though we had been founding members of the club!  The impression the staff made on all of us was a lasting and positive testament to how well the club is managed.

Colorado Golf Club stands as truly and elite Colorado golf facility. Colorado Golf Club is slowly climbing the list of enviable private club invites for those in the know.

Colorado Golf Club

Parker, CO

Designers:  Bill Coore/Ben Crenshaw

Opened for play in 2007

Private Golf Course

www.coloradogolfclub.com

 

Arrowhead Golf Club is a sight for everyone to behold

Just south of the ever spreading Denver sprawl sits one of Colorado’s most iconic golf courses: Arrowhead Golf Club. The reason this course is where all of the golfing locals take their out-of-town guests is 300 million years in the making. You won’t find many courses anywhere in there world that is routed through looming red rock formations that stand in stark contrast to the green grass and the Colorado blue bird skies.

From the very first tee shot players will face extreme elevation changes, abundant wildlife, and thousands of feet of ancient red sandstone rocks towering majestically above the fairways. Arrowhead is one of the top-10 most photographed golf courses in the world, and has been voted the #1 public golf course in the Denver area, as well as one of America’s “Top 75 Public Courses” by Golf Digest.

Since its opening in 1972, the Robert Trent Jones Jr./Sr. design has been a course to brag about playing, and will continue that reputation for many years to come. Thankfully, Arrowhead remains fully accessible to the public, allowing anyone to share in the truly amazing golf experience. The unique design could easily have been hidden behind the veil of privacy reserved for only the wealthy, but that doesn’t mean the experience comes cheap. This one-of-a-kind golf experience is going to be on the high end of the daily fee scale but well worth the price of admission!

Arrowhead Golf Club

Littleton, CO

Designers:  Robert Trent Jones Sr./Robert Trent Jones Jr.

Opened for play in 1972

Daily Fee Golf Course

www.arrowheadcolorado.com

 

 

How to make authentic Masters pimento cheese sandwiches (supposedly)

pimentocheeseA tradition unlike any other; an unforgettable experience; the pinnacle of golf excellence — much can be said about the famous $1.50 pimento cheese sandwiches at Augusta National.

Now, if you live anywhere but the American South, chances are you couldn’t care less about a pimento cheese recipe. But just like sweet tea, the difference is in the details, and these recipes are often closely guarded — no kidding. Augusta is already known to take its traditions seriously, slapping many a small business with cease-and-desist orders for just about anything that resembles anything Masters related (even the damn color scheme), and the famous pimento cheese recipe is no different.

Really though, how different can a cheese, pimento and mayo mixture really be? Apparently quite a bit. A quick Google search delivers a myriad of renditions for Augusta’s “original” recipe, though, those who’ve actually made the coveted concoction for the tournament refuse to share the actual ingredients (and are probably subject to non-disclosure agreements, knowing Augusta). In 2013, the last time Augusta’s recipe changed with a new vendor — much to the ire of attendees — ESPN’s Wright Thompson tracked down what could be the authentic version, though he still couldn’t unlock the “secret” ingredient, only that there is one for sure.

According to Southern Living Magazine, the only published version of the authentic recipe *could* be found in the Tea-Time at The Masters: A Collection of Recipes, by the Georgia Junior League of Augusta (copyright 1977). That’s the recipe cited on gatewaymacon.com, a Georgia travel guide, though, we can’t say for sure the secret has been revealed.

Whether this is the bonafide authentic version of Augusta’s famed recipe or not, it’s the one we’ll be using Masters weekend.

Augusta National’s Pimento Cheese Sandwiches

Ingredients
3 cups shredded white cheddar cheese
2 cups shredded yellow sharp cheddar cheese
4 oz crumbled blue cheese
1 cup shredded Parmesan cheese
1 (4-oz) jar sliced pimentos, drained
1 cup light mayo
2 tbs Dijon mustard
1 loaf of white bread

Preparation
Combine cheeses, pimentos, mayo and mustard in a food processor and process until smooth. Cover and chill. Spread on bread slices.

Cure Putters offer an antidote for flat stick woes

Cure putters

According to a study by Dr. Lucius Riccio, an original member of the USGA’s handicap research team, cited by golfpracticeguides.com, the average golfer makes 36 strokes or less with a putter per 18-hole round. That’s two putts per hole, and, according to our math skills, is pretty much half of the total number of strokes you’d make for a par 72 round. Kinda makes you realize just how awful three putts can be, and how important your flat stick really is.

Practice usually does make perfect, but when you’ve reached a point in your game where you’re comfortable with your putting stroke, it’s time to tinker with the tech.

Like drivers, big brand names typically dictate what most consider “the best” putters on the market, but if you’re really serious about saving strokes on the green, consider looking at smaller, specialized clubmakers. Cure Putters is a perfect example. The company launched with two models at the 2014 PGA Merchandise Show to immediate success. 5 years later Cure touts 12 models, each designed to perform for every golfer.

Cure TourX1

Cure’s Tour X1 blade putter

Cure’s claim to fame is its “extremely High MOI” (moment of inertia). As the company explains on the website, a common misconception regarding high MOI putters is that they only offer forgiveness on off-center hits. They certainly do, but Cure’s high MOI designs also keep the clubface more square throughout the entire stroke, which, combined with that off-center forgiveness, equals more distance and directional control. (These results are also based on a player’s individual “IDEAL WEIGHT” — which basically means you’ll want to be fitted to optimize the weight of your Cure putter.)

The company graciously sent 3 putters built to spec to the CGB headquarters for review purposes, and our first impressions from the practice green: Cure = Pure. (We won’t be sending these back.)

With my usual blade putter, a pre-Titleist Scotty Cameron, I sometimes struggle with the initial takeaway in my backswing, wavering off square from the ball within the first few inches of my stroke. When this happens, I find myself focusing solely on correcting my clubface mid swing — often over or under compensating — and neglecting the other factors determining if the ball goes in the hole or not, like distance control. But after several practice putts with the Cure Tour X1 ($299.95), I found myself having to force the clubhead to waver on my takeaway to produce similar mishits. The Tour X1’s aluminum clubhead, with tungsten weights in the toe and heel and removable steel weights in the back, helps promote a straight and silky smooth stroke overall — truly noticeable — and the feel and sound of the ball coming off the 4.85″ milled face is unreal. Putt after putt after putt with the Cure rolled as pure and on line as one could ask for, and even toed and heeled shots only went slightly off line, still delivering not-so-terrible results. The confidence this club brings to my backswing allows me to focus on my desired line and pace, knowing the ball will come square off the clubface. Finding the pace can be a bit tricky to get used to if your Cure is any heavier than the putter you’re use to playing — really, though, when is it not? — and you may find it all to easy to muscle it past the hole until you get it dialed in (all the more reason to get fitted.)

The Tour X1 is a beautiful club to look at, too. Though one of Cure’s smaller designs, the clubhead is still larger than most blades you’ll see, but with a solid black finish, hidden weights and clean lines, it isn’t distracting to the eye or gaudy in any way. Aside the X1, Cure’s Tour Series includes two mallet designs in the X2 and X3, both with seemingly impressive features along the same lines.

Cure CX1

Cure’s CX1 blade putter

The praise continues on to the CX1 ($279.95) from Cure’s Classic Series. With a slightly larger 5″ clubface, the CX1 touts the same weight systems, milled face and high MOI as the Tour X1, but the slightly bulkier design reads and feels a lot more like a mallet hybrid than a traditional blade putter — the best of both worlds. Speaking of mallets, the Classic Series includes two traditional mallet designs with the CX3 and CX4, and rounds out its blade design offerings with the CX2. The Classic Series putters are also available in red, black, or white, to add another touch of style.

While it’s clear Cure putters isn’t making your average blades and mallets, the company obviously wants to make sure it stands out from the pack. The RX Series does an excellent job of that — easily the most customizeable putters that have ever come through the CGB headquarters. The RX Series sports an eye-catching door handle design and “t bar” alignments; the putters vary by profile size with the RX3 ($259.95) being the smallest with a 5.25″ milled face. Other than that, there’s little you can’t customize on these putters. Each comes with two, 12g, 1/4″ aluminum and two, 35g, 1/4″ steel toe and heel disk weights added and removed with a standard hex tool (additional weight sets sold separately). Not only that, the RX Series boast interchangeable shafts and customizeable lie angles.

When we first heard of this feature, honestly, is sounded like a pain in the ass to have to worry about or adjust in on the fly, but that is far from reality. Two screws on the bottom of the putter loosen the shaft housing with a 1/4 turn, allowing you to move the shaft freely and adjust the angle as needed. All in all, the RX Series may sound more like a DeChambeau-like science experiment than something an average golfer would have in the bag, but the customization process takes about as long as it does to adjust the loft on your driver — and a lot more fun — so don’t let that be a deterrent. Sorry, lefties, the RX Series putters come RH only, in black or red.

Cure RX3

Cure’s RX3 putter

While we’ve only had the chance to play those noted above, we can assume the same performance rings true throughout the company’s offerings. Cure putters — all of which are USGA conforming — come equipped with straight or offset shafts in standard lengths (custom lengths available by request), a branded Winn Pistol midsize grip and durable leather clubhead cover. The company also offers accessories and gear, as well as a trade-in program. Really, if you’re interested in making more gains on the green, you’d be remiss to not try a Cure putter, at the very least. With an optimized stroke using your own ideal weight, you my find yourself inching closer to that 36 or below number at the end of your round.

The best 6 months of golf in 2019 are finally upon us

Depending on how you look at it, the new Tour’s been enjoying an exciting start to the calendar year, and it’s about to get even better. Over next 6 months, the golf world will be blessed with major tournament after major tournament (literally), keeping us satiated through August.

Here’s a quick break down of the major schedule in store — plan accordingly:

March — The Players Championship

2018 Winner: Web Simpson
Dates: March 14 – 17
Course: TPC Sawgrass, Florida
Broadcast: Golf Channel | NBC

Everyone’s favorite non major major, The Players Championship, celebrates 45 years in 2019. There has yet to be a back-to-back Players Champion; as of this writing Webb Simpson is sitting at 33/1 odds to be the first, according to betting-directory.com.

April — The Masters

2018 Winner: Patrick Reed
Dates: April 11 – 14
Course: Agusta National, Georgia
Broadcast: CBS | ESPN

The last several Masters Tournaments have been quite dramatic, with Spieth’s now infamous meltdown in 2017 and the tour’s favorite punching bag, Patrick Reed, joining the green jacket club last year. Here’s to another memorable weekend amongst the azaleas.

May — PGA Championship

2018 Winner: Brooks Koepka
Dates: May 16 – 19
Course: Bethpage Black Course, New York
Broadcast: CBS | TNT

Inevitable storylines sure to surface at the PGA Championship: How will Bethpage play hosting its first PGA Championship (foreshadowing the 2024 Ryder Cup)? Will this be the year Jordan Spieth caps his career Grand Slam? Will Tiger better his second place finish last year? … The list is endless.

June — U.S. Open

2018 Winner: Brooks Koepka
Dates: June 13 – 16
Course: Pebble Beach, California
Broadcast: FOX | FX1

The U.S. Open returns to Pebble Beach for a sixth time, but this year is a little more special; the iconic course is celebrating its 100th birthday. Koepka will look to add to his consecutive U.S. Open titles, but others have proven they can go low when the stakes are high, too — 65s are becoming a norm on the U.S. Open leaderboard.

July — The Open Championship

2018 Winner: Francesco Molinari
Dates: 18 – 21
Course: Royal Portrush, Ireland
Broadcast: Golf Channel | NBC

As the oldest, original major championship, it’s hard to find anything new to say about The Open. But 2019 does signify something of a special reconnection as the tournament returns to Northern Ireland’s Royal Portrush for the first time in almost 70 years.

August — Tour Championship

2018 Winner: Tiger Woods
Dates: August 22 – 25
Course: East Lake, Georgia
Broadcast: Golf Channel | NBC

Though also not a major, the Tour Championship is A LOT more important in regards to the FedEx Cup. That’s because players who do not win the Tour Championship will no longer be able to claim the FedEx Cup title. According to a breakdown by CBSSports.com, players will come into the tournament with an assigned score based on their FedEx Cup rankings — the no.1 ranked player will begin at 10-under par, no.2 at 9-under, and so on to the bottom 5, whom will start at even par — setting the stage for a dramatic comeback victory or a total blowout to end the summer swing.

Get your popcorn ready.